Gum Recession | San Antonio Periodontist

ThinkstockPhotos-185147513One of the most common dental problems is gum recession, yet it’s frequently ignored because it occurs slowly. Gum recession is the process of the gums pulling back from the tooth, exposing more of the tooth material than normal. Many patients first notice tooth sensitivity, or perhaps they notice a single tooth looks longer than the others. While gum recession is often painless, it should not be ignored.

There are a handful of causes of receding gums – the most frequent, by far, is periodontal disease – bacterial infection within the gums that damages tissue and bone. Some people are genetically predisposed to gum disease, and may experience gum recession regardless of how well they brush and floss their teeth.

Other frequent causes include aggressive tooth brushing, tobacco use, grinding your teeth, and crooked teeth / general tooth misalignment , which can cause excess force to be placed on the gums, which eventually causes recession.

Fortunately, receding gums can be treated in a variety of ways. Mild cases of periodontal disease can be treated with deep cleaning, where the plaque and tartar buildup is removed. In some cases, a periodontist may recommend pocket depth reduction, where the gum tissue will be folded back, cleaned, and then reattached to the tooth. In extreme cases, the periodontist may recommend the use of regenerative material (such as grafted tissue or regenerative membranes) to stimulate bone growth and ensure strong gums in the years ahead.

While the causes and solutions vary, the need for prompt dental attention is constant: if you notice gum recession, or even unusually sensitive teeth, contact your dentist today for a thorough exam.

If you have any questions or want to schedule a visit for more information on prevention, call  at Andrew Weber DDS at 210-496-5603 or visit our website atperiodontistsanantonio.com or excellentperiodontist.com.

Causes & Prevention of Periodontal Disease | San Antonio Periodontist

periodontal gum recessionIf your hands bled when you washed them, you would be concerned. Yet, many people think it’s normal if their gums bleed when they brush or floss. In a 1999 study, researchers found that half of Americans over 30 had bleeding gums.

Swollen and bleeding gums are early signs that your gums are infected with bacteria. If nothing is done, the infection can spread. It can destroy the structures that support your teeth in your jawbone. Eventually, your teeth can become so loose that they have to be extracted.

For many years scientists have been trying to figure out what causes periodontal disease. It is now well accepted that bacteria in dental plaque are the major villains. Researchers also are learning more about how an infection in your gums can affect your overall health.

In recent years, gum disease has been linked to other health problems. This is a new and exciting area of research. Many questions remain. Studies have produced varying answers about how much of a connection exists between gum disease and other medical problems. More research is needed.

Researchers are studying possible connections between gum disease and:

  • Atherosclerosis and heart disease — Gum disease may increase the risk of clogged arteries and heart disease. It also is believed to worsen existing heart disease.
  • Stroke — Gum disease may increase the risk of the type of stroke that is caused by blocked arteries.
  • Premature births — A woman who has gum disease during pregnancy may be more likely to deliver her baby too early. The infant may be more likely to be of low birth weight.
  • Diabetes — Diabetic patients with periodontal disease may have more trouble controlling their blood sugar than diabetic patients with healthy gums.
  • Respiratory disease — Bacteria involved in gum disease may cause lung infections or worsen existing lung conditions. This is particularly important for elderly adults in institutions such as nursing homes. In this group, bacteria from the mouth may reach the lungs and may cause severe pneumonia.

What Causes Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal disease is caused by bacteria in dental plaque. Plaque is the sticky substance that forms on your teeth soon after you have brushed. In an effort to get rid of the bacteria, the cells of your immune system release substances that inflame and damage the gums, periodontal ligament or alveolar bone. This leads to swollen, bleeding gums, a sign of gingivitis (the earliest stage of periodontal disease). Damage from periodontal disease also can cause teeth to become loose. This is a sign of severe periodontitis (the advanced stage of disease).

You can prevent periodontal disease by practicing good oral hygiene and visiting your dentist regularly. Most people should see the dentist about once every six months. But if you already have gum disease you may need to visit more often.

Daily brushing and flossing, when done correctly, can help to remove most of the plaque from your teeth. Professional cleanings by your dentist or dental hygienist will keep plaque under control in places that are harder for a toothbrush or floss to reach.

If oral hygiene slips or you skip dental visits, plaque builds up on the teeth. Eventually, it spreads below the gum line. The bacteria are protected there because your toothbrush can’t reach them. If plaque is not removed, the bacteria will continue to multiply. Your gum inflammation may get worse.

The buildup of plaque below the gum line causes the gums to become inflamed. As the gums swell, they detach from the tooth. This process forms a space, or “pocket,” between the tooth and gum. Bacteria can grow rapidly in the pockets. This encourages further plaque buildup.

If left untreated, periodontal disease may destroy the periodontal ligament and the alveolar bone, the structures that support your teeth.

Another reason to remove plaque promptly is that over time it becomes hardened or calcified and turns into calculus. This is commonly called tartar. Even more plaque attaches to calculus because it’s a rougher surface than tooth enamel. It’s also rougher than cementum, a layer that covers the tooth root. Calculus and plaque build up in layers.

Using a tartar-control toothpaste may help slow the build-up of calculus around your teeth. It can’t affect the tartar that already has formed below the gum line, however.

Risks and Prevention

The bacteria in plaque are the main cause of periodontal disease. But several other factors also can contribute. They include other diseases, medicines and oral habits. These factors can increase your risk of gum disease or make it worse once the infection has set in.

  • Genes — Some people are more likely than others to get periodontal disease because of their genes. But your genes do not make gum disease inevitable. Even people who are highly prone to periodontal disease can prevent or control the disease with good oral care.
  • Smoking and tobacco use — Smoking increases the risk of periodontal disease. The longer you smoke, and the more you smoke, the higher the risk. If you have periodontal disease, smoking makes it more severe. Smoking is a major reason that some cases of periodontal disease are resistant to treatment. Smokers tend to collect more tartar on their teeth. They often develop deeper periodontal pockets once they have gum disease. They also are likely to lose more bone as the disease gets worse. Unlike many other factors that affect the health of your gums, the decision to smoke or not is under your control. Quitting smoking can play a major role in bringing periodontal disease under control.
  • Misaligned or crowded teeth, braces or bridgework — Anything that makes it more difficult to brush or floss your teeth is likely to enhance plaque and tartar formation. The more plaque and tartar you have, the greater your chance of developing gum disease. Dentists and periodontists can show you the best ways to clean your teeth, even if they are hard to clean. For example, you can use special tools and ways of threading floss to clean around bridgework or slide under braces. If overcrowded or crooked teeth are a problem, your dentist might recommend orthodontics. This could straighten out your smile and give you a better chance of preventing disease.
  • Grinding, gritting or clenching of teeth — These habits won’t cause periodontal disease. However, they can lead to more severe disease if your gums are already inflamed. These habits exert excess force on the teeth. This pressure appears to speed up the breakdown of the periodontal ligament and bone. In many cases, people can learn to stop this habit simply by recognizing when it is happening and then relaxing. If these efforts don’t work, your dentist or periodontist can create a custom guard appliance to help reduce the pressure of clenching or grinding on the teeth. This device is sometimes called an occlusal guard, night guard, mouth guard or bite guard.
  • Stress — Stress can make periodontal disease worse and harder to treat. Stress weakens your body’s immune system. This makes it harder for your body to fight off infection, including periodontal disease.
  • Fluctuating hormones — Whenever hormone levels go up and down in the body, changes can occur in the mouth. Puberty and pregnancy can temporarily increase the risk and severity of gum disease. So can menopause.
  • Medicines — Several types of medicines can cause dry mouth. Examples include certain drugs for depression and high blood pressure. If you don’t have enough saliva, plaque is more likely to form. This may lead to tooth decay (cavities). Other medicines may cause the gums to enlarge.
  • Diseases — People with certain diseases have a higher risk of developing periodontal disease. For example, people with diabetes are more likely to get periodontitis than people without diabetes. Their gum disease is also likely to be more severe. Other diseases that increase periodontal disease risk include inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and HIV infection. Having one of these diseases can make the control of your periodontal disease more difficult. But a good periodontist or dentist who is aware of these problems can give you guidance on how to maintain your periodontal health.
  • Poor nutrition — Nutrition is important for overall good health, including a working immune system and healthy gums and mouth. Severe vitamin C deficiency (scurvy) can cause bleeding gums(Source: Colgate).

 

If you have any questions or want to schedule a visit for more information on prevention, call  at Andrew Weber DDS at 210-496-5603 or visit our website atperiodontistsanantonio.com or excellentperiodontist.com.

 

What Causes Gum Recession? | Periodontist San Antonio

periodontal smallGum recession is when the margin of the gum tissue that surrounds the teeth wears away, or pulls back, exposing more of the tooth, or the tooth’s root. When gum recession occurs, “pockets,” or gaps, form between the teeth and gum line, making it easy for disease-causing bacteria to build up. If left untreated, the supporting tissue and bone structures of the teeth can be severely damaged, and may ultimately result in tooth loss.

Gum recession is a common dental problem. Most people don’t know they have gum recession because it occurs gradually. The first sign of gum recession is usually tooth sensitivity, or you may notice a tooth looks longer than normal. Typically, a notch can be felt near the gum line.

Gum recession is not something you want to ignore. If you think your gums are receding, make an appointment with your dentist. There are treatments that can repair the gum and prevent further damage.

There are a number of reasons that your gums may be receding. Gum recession typically occurs when gingival tissues creeps down your tooth, exposing the root which makes your tooth looks taller. If your gums have started to recede a thin layer of dentin is exposed, making teeth prone to sensitivity, staining and tooth decay. Some of the most common factors in gum recession include:

Periodontal Disease- More commonly known as gum disease, is bacterial infection that destroys gum tissue and the supporting bone that holds your teeth in place. Gum disease is the main cause of gum recession and can also results in tooth loss.

Aggressive Tooth Brushing- Not many know this, but breathing your teeth to hard or the wrong way can also cause gums your to recede. Brushing to aggressively the wrong way can cause the enamel to wear as well as cause the sensitive gum tissues to recede.

Genes- In some cases people whose parents had chronic gum recession can be more susceptible to receding gums. Studies have even shown that 30% of the population may be subject to gum disease, no matter how well you keep care of your teeth.

Tobacco Use- Smoking and chewing tobacco can cause significant gum recession as well as gum disease. Smoking tobacco causes the gum tissues to lose blood supplies, allowing for infection. Chewing tobacco physically irritates the tissue due to the materials, this ongoing irritation can result in gum recession in the area where the tobacco if help or moved around.

Lack of Dental Care- Not keeping up with a normal dental routine can cause several problems. Receding gums can be a result of untreated cavities, postponed cleanings, and persistent gum problems.

Piercings of the Tongue or Lip- Constant irritation of the gums from a lip or tongue piecing can cause for the gum to recede. You may not feel the piercing is uncomfortable, but repetitive rubbing against the soft tissues will result in tissue damage.

Misaligned Teeth- When teeth are not aligned evenly it can cause too much force on your gums and bones. Usually, it’s only the few crooked teeth that are susceptible to gum recession. Crooked teeth can also get more plaque buildup they’re more difficult to clean, which can cause gingivitis.

There are a few ways to approach the treatment of receding gums, surgical and nonsurgical; each one depends on your individual case. Mild gum recession can be treated with a deep cleaning of the affected areas. As for the more extreme cases, gum surgery may be required.

If you have any questions or want to schedule a visit for more information on gum recession, call  at Andrew Weber DDS at 210-496-5603 or visit our website atperiodontistsanantonio.com or excellentperiodontist.com.

What is Periodontal Disease? | Periodontist San Antonio

close up smile red lipstickPeriodontitis, also generally called gum disease or periodontal disease, begins with bacterial growth in your mouth and may end — if not properly treated — with tooth loss due to destruction of the tissue that surrounds your teeth(Source: webmd.com).

Plaque is the primary cause of gum disease. However, other factors can contribute to periodontal disease.

Here are some warning signs that can signal a problem:

  • Gums that bleed easily
  • Red, swollen, tender gums
  • Gums that have pulled away from the teeth
  • Persistent bad breath or bad taste
  • Permanent teeth that are loose or separating
  • Changes in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • Changes in the fit of partial dentures

There are several factors that can increase your risk of developing periodontal disease. Things such as:

  • Smoking
  • Pregnancy
  • Diabetes
  • Alcohol use
  • Poor oral hygiene

Even if you don’t notice any symptoms, you may still have some degree of gum disease. In some people, gum disease may affect only certain teeth, such as the molars. Only a dentist or a periodontist can recognize and determine the progression of gum disease.

Keeping your teeth and gums healthy requires a daily hygiene routine of brushing twice a day and after meals, flossing, using mouthwash and maintaining a healthy diet. Also, visit your dentist for routine cleanings and checkups. Prevention is the key to oral success!

Call Andrew Weber, DDS for an appointment today at 210-496-5603. Visit our websites to learn more at www.periodontistsanantonio.com and www.excellentperiodontist.com.

Periodontal Abscesses

494183909For many patients, periodontal disease can worsen over time because in its early stages it is typically painless and hidden. Indeed, early stages of periodontal disease are often completely symptomless. However, as periodontal disease advances, more and more symptoms become apparent as the periodontal tissues become impacted.

One of the possible problems that may arise due to periodontal disease is a periodontal abscess, and unlike early stages of periodontal disease, abscesses make their presence known. A periodontal abscess is a collection of pus within the periodontal tissue. The pus is typically due to severe infections, often originating within a nearby decaying tooth. The pus builds up into a pocket within the gum, causing pain and discomfort.

Symptoms of a periodontal abscess typically include sudden onset pain, which is worse when biting. The pain is typically deep and throbbing, and the affected tooth may be mobile. When the pus pocket forms, there will be pressure and a raised bubble of tissue, and often the pocket will break, the pus will discharge into the mouth, and the patient will notice a bad taste.

An experienced Periodontist should be consulted if a patient is found to have a periodontal abscess. Initial treatment will involve pain and infection management, followed by measures to treat the cause of the infection, and a determination of how much of the tooth can be saved. In some cases, a root canal may be necessary; in others, the tooth may be removed entirely. In any situation where a dental abscess is observed, the patient should seek professional assistance to regain proper dental health and work towards building long term behaviors to maintain healthy gums and teeth for life.

Call Andrew Weber, DDS for an appointment today at 210-496-5603. Visit our websites to learn more at www.periodontistsanantonio.com and www.excellentperiodontist.com.

What is the Difference Between Gingivitis and Periodontal Disease?

477787597Gingivitis is inflammation of the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth and is most commonly a result of poor dental hygiene. Gingivitis is a very common condition and varies widely in severity. It is characterized by red, swollen gums that bleed easily when teeth are brushed or flossed. Gingivitis is not the same thing as periodontitis, although sometimes a person may be affected by both. Gum disease is mostly caused by improper oral hygiene that allows bacteria in plaque and calculus to remain on the teeth and infect the gums.

But there are other factors that increase the risk of developing gingivitis. Some of the most common risk factors are as follows:

  • Smoking or chewing tobacco prevents the gum tissue from being able to heal.
  • Crooked, rotated, or overlapping teeth create more areas for plaque and calculus to accumulate and are harder to keep clean.
  • Hormonal changes in puberty, pregnancy, and menopause typically correlate with a rise in gingivitis. The increase in hormones causes the blood vessels in the gums to be more susceptible to bacterial and chemical attack.
  • Cancer and cancer treatment can make a person more susceptible to infection and increase the risk of gum disease.
  • Stress impairs the body’s immune response to bacterial invasion.
  • Mouth breathing can be harsh on the gums when they aren’t protected by the lips, causing chronic irritation and inflammation.
  • Poor nutrition, such as a diet high in sugar and carbohydrates and low in water intake, will increase the formation of plaque. Also, a deficiency of important nutrients such as vitamin C will impair healing.
  • Diabetes mellitus impairs circulation and the gums ability to heal.
  • Medications such as anti-seizure medications promote gum disease(Source: medicinenet.com)

While gingivitis is inflammation of the gums around the teeth, periodontal disease occurs when the bone below the gums gets inflamed or infected.

Gingivitis starts as food debris mixes with saliva and bacteria-forming plaque that sticks on the surfaces of teeth. If dental plaque and tartar aren’t removed by brushing with toothpaste and flossing, it can become mineralized and form tartar, or calculus. Tartar is very hard and can only be removed by a professional dental cleaning.

Both dental plaque and tartar are filled with harmful bacteria, and if they aren’t removed from teeth, they will begin to irritate the gums and cause gingivitis. If left untreated, gingivitis will often extend from the gums to the bone and lead to periodontitis. When the underlying bone gets infected, it will start to recede away from the teeth and form deep gum pockets. These pockets collect plaque and bacteria as they are very difficult to keep clean, and more bone loss occurs. As periodontal disease progresses into later stages and more bone tissue is lost, the teeth may eventually become loose and fall out.

Call Andrew Weber, DDS for an appointment today at 210-496-5603. Visit our websites to learn more at www.periodontistsanantonio.com and www.excellentperiodontist.com.

Benefits of a Warm Salt Water Rinse | Periodontist San Antonio

459953231Warm salt water as an oral rinse? Yes! There are many benefits to the method. The inherent preserving and antibacterial properties in salt when applied to foods is well known, but it has tremendous effects on microbes, too, when diluted and dissolved in water. The reason why salt water is effective as a mouth rinse is because it is more than just a disinfectant; it also helps in removing swelling of oral tissues. Therefore, using salt water for weeks, post tooth extraction, or in case of mouth ulcer or infection, works very well as a treatment, for short-term.

Conditions That Benefit From Salt Water Mouth Rinse

  • Halitosis: Halitosis is the medical term for bad breath. It is an uncomfortable condition that happens to people for some underlying reasons. While poor oral hygiene is a cause, despite washing your mouth for several times you may still fail to beat halitosis. Rinsing your mouth with salt water can prevent bacterial growth and infection, which often causes halitosis.
  • Gingivitis: Gingivitis is a typical condition characterized by swelling, inflammation and bleeding gums caused due to growth of bacteria that coats teeth naturally. Bacteria proliferation forms a sticky and whitish film, called plaque. Rinsing the mouth with salt water solution daily can help in soothing inflamed gums and wipes out bacteria.
  • Toothache: Toothache can happen to anyone; it is a common complication caused by several reasons. While bacteria is one of the main cause, sometimes, weak roots or open nerve endings can also lead to sensitivity and throbbing in teeth. Gargling regularly with salt water can offer some relief.
  • Sore Throat: Sore throat causing cough and pain is common and a seasonal condition. Salt water gargle can help in relieving soreness.

Salt water has been used by multiple cultures over countless generations to clean wounds and rinse out mouths. Salt has antibacterial and preserving properties when applied in abundance to foods, but its affect on microbes when dissolved and diluted in water is less clear. Salt water changes the pH of the mouth, which deters the reproduction of many microorganisms, but it doesn’t outright kill many forms. At the very least, salt water is soothing to the mucous membranes of your mouth, but it should not be swallowed in quantity. Talk to your dentist about the benefits of washing your mouth with salt water.

Call Andrew Weber, DDS for an appointment today at 210-496-5603. Visit our websites to learn more at www.periodontistsanantonio.com andwww.excellentperiodontist.com.

What is Gingivitis? – Periodontist San Antonio

multiple smilesWhat is Gingivitis? According to the ADA Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums, usually caused by a bacterial infection. If left untreated, it can become a more serious infection known as periodontitis and can cause tooth loss. Your gums actually attach to the teeth at a lower point than the gum edges that we see. This forms a small space called a sulcus. Food can get trapped in this space and cause a gum infection or gingivitis. Plaque is a thin film of bacteria. It constantly forms on the surface of your teeth. As plaque advances, it hardens and becomes tartar. You can develop an infection when plaque extends below the gum line. Left unchecked, gingivitis can cause the gums to separate from the teeth. This can cause injury to the soft tissue and bone supporting the teeth. The tooth may become loose and unstable. If infection progresses, you may ultimately lose your tooth or need a dentist to remove it.

What Are the Symptoms of Gingivitis?

Many people aren’t aware that they have gingivitis. It’s possible to have gum disease without any symptoms. However, the following can be symptoms of gingivitis:

  • gums that are red, tender, or swollen
  • gums that bleed when you brush or floss your teeth
  • gums that have pulled away from the teeth
  • loose teeth
  • a change in how your teeth fit together when you bite (malocclusion)
  • pus between teeth and gums
  • pain when chewing
  • sensitive teeth
  • partial dentures that no longer fit
  • foul-smelling breath that does not go away after you brush your teeth(Source: healthline.com)

You must practice proper oral hygiene to treat gingivitis. You should also cut back on any smoking and control your diabetes. Other treatments include deep cleaning your teeth, antibiotic medications, and surgery. Of course Gingivitis can be prevented by proper and consistent oral hygiene. Make certain to eat a balanced diet and visit the dentist regularly. Brush your teeth twice daily with fluoride toothpaste and floss your teeth every day.

Call Andrew Weber, DDS for an appointment today at 210-496-5603. Visit our websites to learn more at www.periodontistsanantonio.com and www.excellentperiodontist.com.

Pinhole Technique Certified – Periodontist San Antonio

periodontal gum recessionDr. Weber is a Certified Pinhole Technique Clinician. What does that mean? Dr. Weber is one of only a small number of doctors who has been trained to perform this groundbreaking procedure to correct ginigival recession.

The Chao Pinhole® Surgical Technique (PST), invented and patented by John Chao, D.D.S., is a scalpel-free, suture-free procedure for correcting gum recession. Through a small hole made by a needle, Dr. Chao uses specially designed instruments to gently loosen the gum tissue and glide it over the receded part of the tooth. Since there is no cutting or stitching, patients can expect minimal post-operative symptoms (pain, swelling and bleeding). Most patients also are pleasantly surprised by the instant cosmetic improvement.

The unique features of the Pinhole Surgical Technique have aroused keen interest on the part of the media. So far news programs at 240 TV stations have featured this scalpel-free technique of treating a problem that is found in half of the U.S. population (JADA, 2003). Dr. Chao made a guest appearance on the nationally syndicated “The Doctors Show,” “Dr. Steve Show,” “ABC,” “NBC,” and over 240 other stations across the U.S. and Canada, reaching an estimated 10 million viewers. For this reason, you may have already heard questions and comments from your colleagues and patients about this “breakthrough” method of correcting ginigival recession.

Watch Dr. Chao explain his Pinhole Technique on ‘The Doctors': https://youtu.be/JxjKvUKXgKg

Dr. Chao was granted patents and trademarks on the PST method and PST instruments by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Please also see “The Pinhole Surgical Technique, A Novel Approach to Root Coverage,” as published in October, 2012 issue of The International Journal of Periodontics and Restorative Dentistry, a high-impact, peer-review journal(Source: pinholesurgicaltechnique.com).

To discuss the Pinhole Surgical Technique contact Dr. Andrew Weber DDS at 210-496-5603 or visit our website at periodontistsanantonio.com orexcellentperiodontist.com.

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month | San Antonio Periodontist

459953231April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month. Oral cancer refers to cancer that develops in any of the parts that make up the mouth. Oral cancer is one of several types of cancer grouped in a category called head and neck cancers. Mouth cancer and other head and neck cancers are often treated similarly.

While some think this is a rare cancer, mouth cancers will be newly diagnosed in about 115 new individuals each day in the US alone, and a person dies from oral cancer every hour of every day. If you add the sub category of laryngeal throat cancers, the rates of occurrence (about 12,000 additional new cases per year) and death are significantly higher. When found at early stages of development, oral cancers have an 80 to 90 % survival rate. Unfortunately at this time, the majority are found as late stage cancers, and this accounts for the very high death rate of about 43% at five years from diagnosis (for all stages and etiologies combined at time of diagnosis), and high treatment related morbidity in survivors. Late stage diagnosis is not occurring because most of these cancers are hard to discover, it is because of a lack of public awareness coupled with the lack of a national program for opportunistic screenings which would yield early discovery by medical and dental professionals. Worldwide the problem is far greater, with new cases annually exceeding 450,000.

If you notice any of the below changes, contact your dentist or health care professional immediately.

What Are the Symptoms of Oral Cancer?

The most common symptoms of oral cancer include:

  • Swellings/thickenings, lumps or bumps, rough spots/crusts/or eroded areas on the lips, gums, or other areas inside the mouth
  • The development of velvety white, red, or speckled (white and red) patches in the mouth
  • Unexplained bleeding in the mouth
  • Unexplained numbness, loss of feeling, or pain/tenderness in any area of the face, mouth, or neck
  • Persistent sores on the face, neck, or mouth that bleed easily and do not heal within 2 weeks
  • A soreness or feeling that something is caught in the back of the throat
  • Difficulty chewing or swallowing, speaking, or moving the jaw or tongue
  • Hoarseness, chronic sore throat, or change in voice
  • Ear pain
  • A change in the way your teeth or dentures fit together
  • Dramatic weight loss
  • See your dentist on a regularly. Even though you may be conducting frequent self exams, sometimes dangerous spots or sores in the mouth can be very tiny and difficult to see on your own.
  • The American Cancer Society recommends oral cancer screening exams every 3 years for persons over age 20 and annually for those over age 40.
  • During your next dental appointment, ask your dentist to perform an oral exam. Early detection can improve the chance of successful treatment.

 

During your next dental appointment, ask your dentist to perform an oral exam. Early detection can improve the chance of successful treatment.

Call Andrew Weber, DDS for an appointment today at 210-496-5603. Visit our websites to learn more at www.periodontistsanantonio.com and www.excellentperiodontist.com.